EVENTS

 
     

The Single Barrel is proud to welcome Reckless Kelly to our stage this April!
 

 
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Austin’s own Reckless Kelly are currently touring behind their 8th studio album, “Long Night Moon,” which won a Grammy for Best Recording Package in 2014. The album is the follow-up to 2011’s Grammy Nominated “Good Luck & True Love,” which took home four Lone Star Music Awards, and sent three singles to #1 on Texas Radio. Produced by band members Willy & Cody Braun, along with Lead Guitarist David Abeyta, Long Night Moon was mixed by Ray Kennedy (Steve Earle, Emmylou Harris), and features additional instrumentation from legendary steel guitar player Lloyd Maines, as well as Bukka Allen (piano, organ) and Jeff Plankenhorn (dobro).
 
When Willy Braun, frontman and principal songwriter for the band began writing songs for Long Night Moon, he quickly found a theme emerging. “About halfway through writing this record, I noticed that almost all of the songs I was writing, whether they were songs about the road, life, or love, had something to do with traveling. It started as an accident and I decided to just go with it. Before we knew it, there was a definite theme.” It’s honest, original and constantly evolving. The group is known for their explosive live shows and a passion for making albums of substance. Long Night Moon is no exception to this rule.
 

 
     

The Single Barrel is proud to Welcome Brothers Osborne with special guest Dylan Bloom Band to our stage this April!
 
 
$8 in Advance and $10 Door | 19+
 
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Growing up the sons of a working-class mother and father, T.J. and John Osborne learned at an early age how to make do with what they had. Their blue-collar rural Maryland upbringing was far from the one other kids were experiencing in the nearby affluent suburbs of the nation’s capital. Whether they were lighting their house with candles when the electricity was turned off or using a garden hose for summertime fun, T.J. and John were frequently making something from nothing.
 
That same sensibility informs the music they make as Brothers Osborne, a twang-and-crunch duo that blends equal parts country and rock into one of the freshest, most identifiable sounds to come out of Nashville in recent years.
 
“A lot of the coolest music comes when you don’t have anything else to do and you have random objects lying around,” says John, at 31 the older of the two. “You pick them up and just bang on them to make a noise that makes sense. Writing a song is similar. You’re plucking something out of thin air. All music is literally making something out of nothing.”
 
Driven by T.J.’s sultry, low-down baritone and John’s slow-hand guitar work, Brothers Osborne fills a void for singer/guitarist duos with a presence. They aren’t shoe-gazers—both over six-feet-tall, T.J., 28, is a dynamic singer, full of power and verve, while John commands his instrument with particular swagger. Onstage, they possess the interplay of a country Jagger/Richards.
Influenced heavily by Hank and Merle—“If someone doesn’t like Hank Williams and Merle Haggard, I think there must be something wrong with them,” says T.J., who sports a “Hank” tattoo on his wrist—Brothers Osborne also credit Dwight Yoakam, Tom Petty and, especially, Bob Seger with shaping their sound.
 
“Our family threw a lot of impromptu yard parties: beer, horseshoes and music,” says T.J. “By the end of the night, the whole family would be out singing Bob Seger songs. And then George Jones songs. John and I just wanted to get in that circle with my dad and my uncle and sing. That’s how we got into music.”
 
“There were always guitars around,” adds John, who didn’t differentiate between genres at the Osborne jams. “It wasn’t until later in life that I realized that there were different categories of music. We just listened to music.”
 
Eventually, the brothers relocated to Music City, first John and a year later, T.J. Reunited, the versatile musicians accepted a job backing up a bluegrass artist and cut their teeth on the touring circuit, even playing the Grand Ole Opry.
 
But the pull of doing their own thing was too much to resist. And so Brothers Osborne was born.
Soon, the duo was laying the groundwork for what will become their EMI Records Nashville debut album, a collection of songs—each one written by the brothers—that, while indisputably ready for radio, carry an integrity akin to those of their influences.
 
“Arms of Fire” calls to mind Tom Petty, with its muted chunky guitar riff and all-American lyrics like you’ve got me flying down a James Dean highway. “Shoot From the Hip” is a spaghetti-western throwback, complete with haunting whistle and jangly guitar. The almost whispered “Love the Lonely Out of You” displays the brothers’ more subtle side, while “21 Summer” finds the siblings exalting in nostalgia.
 
And first single “Let’s Go There” is a Stonesy rocker about getting away from it all. It’s also the song that ties the project together.
“‘Let’s Go There’ is the gateway to the rest of the album,” T.J. says. “It has echoes of rock, blues, folk and country, all of the elements on our album wrapped into one song.”
“And it’s got cowbell,” adds John mischievously, who says the lyrics paint a picture of taking a mental vacation. “It’s a conversation, saying, ‘Don’t worry about calling your mother, forget about the dog and the cat, and let’s hit the road. Let’s just do it already.’”
 
However, it’s the ramshackle “Rum” that may best define Brothers Osborne. Its creation inspired many of the tracks on the album, including their debut single. “The early things we did with
Rum’ really translated to ‘Let’s Go There,’” T.J. explains.
 
Originally recorded in the music room of T.J. and John’s shared Nashville home, the boozy escape “Rum” is a back-porch sing-along. It also is the perfect embodiment of the duo’s credo of making something from nothing.
 
To get the song’s signature rhythm, the brothers banged away with drumsticks on the arm of their futon, a $50 steal at a local yard sale. “We wanted to keep it organic and loose, not pristine,” T.J. says.
 
“Rum” even contains a bridge that sums up the boys’ imaginative childhoods:
Lucky folks go to the ocean
Lake’s for the landlocked bunch
We got a tarp in a truck bed
A kiddie pool, a slip n’ sled
 
“Our uncle would put a tarp in the back of a truck and made a pool for us,” John confirms. “We thought that was the first time it was ever done. The point is you can do anything to enjoy a good time. You can drink rum on your front porch and turn on the garden hose and run through it. It’s that simple.”
 
Just like their approach to music.
 
“Creating music is all mental,” concludes John. “It’s dealing with what you have. If you limit what you have to work with, you can really surprise yourself with the results.

 
     

Based in Lincoln, NE, The Emmett Bower Band’s multi-instrumentalist members make this modern Alternative Country act a cut above the rest. Whether it’s covering country classics from Alabama, emulating that “red dirt” vibe of Cross Canadian Ragweed, or taking you to the island with Jimmy Buffett (or perhaps even Sublime).
 

 

 
     

The Single Barrel is proud to welcome Cody Canada and the Departed to our stage for the first time this April!
 

 

 

 
$10 in Adv | $15 Day of Show | 19+ | Doors 8pm

 
The latest, tight incarnation of the Cody Canada-led group The
Departed isn’t a reinvention of the group’s sound, or a reimagining of
Canada’s musical perspective – it’s a reunion. As with any reunion, the
passing years have provided the involved parties with new and unique
perspectives, breathing vibrant excitement into their streamlined new
environment.
 
Canada, Jeremy Plato, Chris Doege and Steve Littleton are reopening
the doors to a sonic garage where sounds and stories some thought
were gone for good are now being unleashed onto an eager public
after a few years of fruitful – even risky — artistic diversion. Being
guided by raw emotion and nerves that are often unguarded, Canada
hasn’t begun to pluck the opening notes to an increasing number of
Cross Canadian Ragweed favorites without some reluctance or painful
reminiscence, mind you. But the powerful nature of such visceral
connections is what makes his stories stunning while rightfully placing
him in a prominent class of modern songwriters occupied by the
influential likes of Robert Earl Keen, Bruce and Charlie Robison, Todd
Snider, Mike McClure and the men of Reckless Kelly, among only a
strict few others.
 
To be clear, the men of the Departed are not the frat-house faves
many of the latest generation of river-tubing popsters are. Ideals and
experiences of a person enduring the sometimes-harsh realities of the
real world demand space in a Departed concert.
 
In the wake of Ragweed’s 2010 dissolution, most fans likely expected
– and few would’ve blamed – Canada for adhering to the heartsleeved,
Okie-rocker recipe that propelled Canada into a true Rock
Star realm. Bolstering his bad-ass bona-fides even more, however,
was his decision to choose the dirt road less traveled. By finally
partnering up with Seth James, a long-time friend universally admired
for his soulful skills, Canada’s words had a different backdrop that
certainly represented commercial risk, but offered an unusually fresh
outlet where the iconic songs of his past, for a while, stayed in the
past. For three years, Canada became a side-man for sections of each
concert as the Departed quickly built a reputation as a crack band
focused on packing as much expertly-curated song-craft into each
show as possible, eschewing the demands for “more Ragweed!”
 
With the chill of 2014’s winter thawing into the haziness of the spring
and the Departed now having played as a powerful four-piece for
several months following James’ amicable exit, Canada’s appreciation
for the truly remarkable, intensely personal body of work he created as he fronted Ragweed is intact, and indeed, fresh with the passing of
time and the healing of emotional wounds. Unsurprisingly, fans are
exuberantly responding to the inclusion of classics such as “Alabama,”
“Dimebag,” and “17” into set-lists for Departed shows. The refitted
outfit is channeling the power chords and raw-bone ballads, which
vaulted Canada into the status as Red Dirt’s biggest name for so long.
 
This is not a comeback. This isn’t a rebirth.
 
This is a rock and roll renewal only an artist with Canada’s strength of
will and determined vision is capable of. He’s making great use of a
rare chance few artists ever receive. He now knows what he only
started to understand many years ago, and his words are all the more
impactful as a result.

 
     

There’s always a good time when Cactus Hill’s in town. Head down to The Single Barrel and kick off the month of February right- with one heck of a rowdy night! Don’t forget your dancing shoes!
 

 
Since inception, the Cactus Hill family has surpassed their initial goal of climbing and then staying at the top of the regional scene.
 
Now a household name amongst club owners and event coordinators, the Hill is the most visible country act in the five state region known as the Midwest. Now considered by many as the most entertaining ensemble around, they still maintain the structure and business savvy that has kept them at the forefront in this competitive demographic.
 
The direction of the band has been refined over the years in order to accommodate the younger audience, and the high level standards remain.

 
     


The Husker’s Spring Game returns in April. Throw in some tunes from the Famous Sidetrack Bank followed by Cactus Hill and we got ourselves a party! Join us on April 11th before and after the game for cold drinks and great tunes. Don’t forget your dancing shoes!
 

 
Since inception, the Cactus Hill family has surpassed their initial goal of climbing and then staying at the top of the regional scene.
 
Now a household name amongst club owners and event coordinators, the Hill is the most visible country act in the five state region known as the Midwest. Now considered by many as the most entertaining ensemble around, they still maintain the structure and business savvy that has kept them at the forefront in this competitive demographic.
 
The direction of the band has been refined over the years in order to accommodate the younger audience, and the high level standards remain.

Come enjoy live music, great booze, and Husker spirit!

 
     

The Single Barrel is proud to welcome Whiskey Bent to our stage this April!
 
Show: 10pm | Tickets: $5 at the door
 
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The Single Barrel is proud to welcome The Great Divide to our stage this April 24th!
 

 

 
$10 in Adv | $12 Day of Show
19+ | Doors at 8pm

 
     

The Single Barrel welcomes Jon Pardi back to our stage this April!
 

 

 
Ticket’s on Sale Now!

$15 in Adv | $20 Day of Show | 19+ | Doors 8pm

 
     

The Single Barrel welcomes Jon Pardi back to our stage this April! Can’t make the 29th? No Problem! We will welcome Jon Pardi back to our stage on April 30th. Trust us, this is a show you don’t want to miss!
 

 

 
Ticket’s on Sale Now!

$15 in Adv | $20 Day of Show | 19+ | Doors 8pm