EVENTS

 
     


back_forty_new

—    THE BACK FORTY    |    Saturday, December 17th, 2016    —

 

—    THE BACK FORTY    —

Late night drinks and impromptu jam sessions turned three musicians into one of the hottest power trios in the Midwest. Lighting up local bars and backyards the only sure thing is where The Back Forty goes, good times are soon to follow. The addition of rock legend Nick Wieman has only served to boost the band into local legend status….good times just got better

 
     


emmett-bower-nye-2016

—    Froggy 98 & Emmett Bower New Years Bash    |    Saturday, December 31, 2016    —

—    $5 Cover    |    21+    |    Call for Reservations    |    Free Champagne Toast at Midnight    —

 

—    EMMETT BOWER BAND    —

The Emmett Bower Band is a rock influenced alt country act born in Nebraska in late October, 2010. The band has had member changes since the beginning and now the current line up is Jeffrey Emmett Bower – acoustic/electric guitars and lead vocals, Jeff Chelewski electric guitar, Troy Johnson – bassjo/electric bass/upright bass, Josh Rector – fiddle/mandolin/harmonica, Matty Sanders – drums/percussion.

The band plays upwards of a 100 shows per year and has played Nashville/Austin and toured the nation. They have shared the stage with the likes of Randy Rogers Band, Roger Creager, Jason Boland and the Stragglers, Bart Crow, Jackson Taylor, Gloriana, Sonia Leigh, No Justice, Thomas Rhett, Jon Pardi, and many others. They have released two self produced records under their own record label It’s A Party Records. They are currently ready to record a 3rd album. Four songs have been played on radio stations in Nebraska, Kansas, and Tennessee on regular rotation. “You saved me”, “Rearview”, “Before She’s Gone”, the current single “Lakin'”! They have grown into larger venues and dance halls playing streetdances, rodeos, weddings and festivals. They pride themselves by writing their own music their own way. There is nothing in the way and these boyz mean business… “it’s all neckbones baby”

 
     


bower_new

Eric Church After Party

—    Friday, January 13th, 2017    —

 

The Emmett Bower Band is a rock influenced alt country act born in Nebraska in late October, 2010. The band has had member changes since the beginning and now the current line up is Jeffrey Emmett Bower – acoustic/electric guitars and lead vocals, Jeff Chelewski electric guitar, Troy Johnson – bassjo/electric bass/upright bass, Josh Rector – fiddle/mandolin/harmonica, Matty Sanders – drums/percussion.

The band plays upwards of a 100 shows per year and has played Nashville/Austin and toured the nation. They have shared the stage with the likes of Randy Rogers Band, Roger Creager, Jason Boland and the Stragglers, Bart Crow, Jackson Taylor, Gloriana, Sonia Leigh, No Justice, Thomas Rhett, Jon Pardi, and many others. They have released two self produced records under their own record label It’s A Party Records. They are currently ready to record a 3rd album. Four songs have been played on radio stations in Nebraska, Kansas, and Tennessee on regular rotation. “You saved me”, “Rearview”, “Before She’s Gone”, the current single “Lakin'”! They have grown into larger venues and dance halls playing streetdances, rodeos, weddings and festivals. They pride themselves by writing their own music their own way. There is nothing in the way and these boyz mean business… “it’s all neckbones baby”

 
     


cactus-hill-2017

 

REUNION SHOW!

—    Saturday, January 14, 2017    —

 

September 22, 1998 was the birth date of what we’ve now come to know as Cactus Hill. Since inception, the Cactus Hill family has surpassed their initial goal of climbing and then staying at the top of the regional scene.

Now a household name amongst club owners and event coordinators, the Hill is the most visible country act in the five state region known as the Midwest. Now considered by many as the most entertaining ensemble around, they still maintain the structure and business savvy that has kept them at the forefront in this competitive demographic.
The direction of the band has been refined over the years in order to accommodate the younger audience, and the high level standards remain.

 

Cactus Hill Facebook

 
     


sheila_greenland_new_2016

—    Saturday, January 21, 2017    —

 

Sheila Greenland’s career started at the early age of six when she performed at local music festivals. Since then, she has won numerous vocal competitions and impressively made it to the finals of TV’s “Nashville Star.” Sheila regularly writes, records and tours. She performs several nights each month, and has opened for such major acts as Brad Paisley, JoDee Messina, and Sara Evans.

Brad Kulwicki – Lead Guitar
Travis Kilpatrick – Drums
Sheila Greenland – Lead Vocals
Brian “Pickle” Gerkensmeyer – Bass

 
     


whiskey_bent_01_new

—    Saturday, January 28th, 2017    —

 

The Whiskey Bent Band is a five-man country rock band based in central Nebraska recognized for its high-energy shows, tight instrumentals and front man Tim Zach’s strong baritone vocals.
In addition to Zach, Whiskey Bent is made up of Jeff Westwood (guitar), Jeff Wilson (drums), Joe Parr (guitar, mandolin, harmonica) and John Victory (bass). Combined, the band has more than 80 years of experience in the music business.

Formed in 2009, Whiskey Bent writes and performs its own music and covers a variety of top artists that include Eric Church, Toby Keith, Jake Owen, Gary Allan and Johnny Cash.
One of the most sought-after club bands in the Midwest, Whiskey Bent is a regular on the summer county fair and country music festival circuit, including the popular Kicker Country Stampede in Manhattan, Kans.

Whiskey Bent is known for its 2012 debut single “On The River” as well as fan favorites “Every Bar’s Got One” and “Gettin By.”
The band released its first full-length album in 2014, which includes eight original songs.
Whiskey Bent has opened or played alongside national acts such as Clay Walker, Rodney Atkins, Trent Tomlinson, Emerson Drive, Collin Raye, Justin Moore, Ronnie Milsap, Casey Donahew Band, The Lost Trailers, Jerrod Niemann and Jake Owen.

Tim Zach — Lead Vocals
Joe Parr — Guitar/Vocals
Jeff Westwood — Guitar/Vocals
John Victory — Bass Guitar
Jeff Wilson — Drums
Kevin Galvan — Sound Tech

 
     


logan-mize-2016

—    LOGAN MIZE    |    Friday, February 10th, 2017    —

—    $15 in Advance / $20 Day of Show    |    19+ Show    |    8pm Doors    —

 

Hurry before they're all gone!

 

 

He’s a new voice for every man. Actually, make him an honest new voice for every man. That would be country-rock singer, songwriter and guitarist Logan Mize. Just listen to his current single “Can’t Get Away from a Good Time,” which was just released to country radio by his label Arista Nashville.

The anticipation is building, particularly since Mize spent a good part of 2013 behind the camera in a couple of high profile turns on the small screen. The Kansas native serendipitously found himself guest starring in two nationally- watched TV appearances that undoubtedly introduced him to new audiences.
He ended up in a widely viewed “Fabric Of Our Life” cotton commercial with Hayden Panettiere of ABC-TV’s lauded Nashville. Mize and his band are shown performing on stage at Music City’s legendary Station Inn. But there’s more: Mize played himself and sang, also with his band, in an episode of The CW’s hit drama Hart of Dixie starring Rachel Bilson.

Mize, 28, saw both tube assignments as great ways to trumpet his debut national CD release, 2012’s Nobody In Nashville, an auspicious 10 song collection that highlights Mize’s rugged voice, his earthy songs and his ability to merge mainstream country with front porch rock ‘n’ roll.

‘I was just happy to get the gigs,” Mize said about the TV exposure. “I was real excited about them. It helped promote Nobody In Nashville. The commercial with Hayden was more just fun, singing some songs for a commercial. We were just playing the songs while she was shooting the commercial.”

About Hart of Dixie, he has this to say: “I just played myself in the series. I had no lines but I was in a battle of the bands club scene and I won the battle of the bands.”

Making Nobody In Nashville, which is the follow-up to Mize’s very independent, regional 2009 self-titled first effort, was a musically organic experience. The disc was released on Big Yellow Dog Music, the imprint of his publishing company. It is an earthy project that puts the emphasis on Mize’s voice, guitar playing and songs. Unpolished gems include “State Of Your Heart,” “Hey Carolina,” “Sunflowers,” “Good Life” and the autobiographical “Rock N Roll Band.”
“It wasn’t auto-tuned or anything,” Mize said about Nobody In Nashville. “The vocals are really raw. There are parts where I cringe a little bit. It’s a really dry sounding record, but I like it because it’s really simple. We didn’t hire the biggest names in Nashville. We kept it very grassroots.”

“Sunflowers,” which is an ode to his home state, will be used as an official state tourism song promoting Kansas. Logan, has also been named an official Kansas Brand Ambassador by the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism and will promote Kansas as a premier visitor destination.

There are no artifices. Mize’s real guy-next-door demeanor is exactly the reason why Nobody In Nashville garnered immediate attention from Roughstock, The Boot, Billboard.com, Keepin’ It Country, and M Music & Musicians magazine. He also has a fan in country and pop superstar LeAnn Rimes, who not only tweeted about Mize’s previous single, “Used Up,” but also invited him to open her 2013 Fall Tour in Europe. Award-winning country vocal group Little Big Town also blew up Twitter with praise for Mize’s “Used Up.”

No stranger to touring, Mize delivers a blistering live show with his commanding onstage presence. He has opened shows for headlining household names Lady Antebellum, The Band Perry, Eric Church, Dierks Bentley, Little Big Town, Blake Shelton, Billy Currington, LeAnn Rimes and Hank Williams, JR.

That’s pretty lofty company for the kid born in Wichita, Kansas who grew up in nearby Clearwater immersed in the music of Tom Petty, Elton John, Alan Jackson, Garth Brooks, The Wallflowers, Nirvana, the Foo Fighters and Stone Temple Pilots.

“If it sounded good to me, I would listen to it,” Mize said about his eclectic musical tastes. “I am a song guy. There is no bias. I like it all.”

His arms-open-wide philosophy extends into family, naturally. Mize, who is married to country singer-songwriter Jill Martin and has a 2-year-old son Lincoln, slowly soaked himself in the history of his great uncle Billy Mize. The elder Mize, now 84, is considered a pioneer in the Bakersfield country sound that emerged in California and was popularized by Buck Owens and Merle Haggard. Mize didn’t learn of his revered kin until he was in his early 20s.

“When I found out about him I really researched the Bakersfield sound. Buck Owens was in Billy’s band. He also got Merle Haggard recognized. He was a behind-the-scenes guy.”

Logan Mize, however, is not only behind a microphone; he’s also in front of the cameras. In characteristically every man fashion he’s getting priceless VIP attention.

 

 
     


wcg2

—    WILLIAM CLARK GREEN    |    Saturday, February 11th, 2017    —

—    $10 in Advance / $15 Day of Show    |    19+ Show    |    8pm Doors    —

 

Hurry before they're all gone!

 

—    WILLIAM CLARK GREEN    —

William Clark Green Is not one for pulling punches. Where some songwriters trade in subtlety and dancing around blunt truths with clever feints and metaphor, Clark aims his words straight to the point and, when needed, right through the heart. His music is unrelentingly direct and hard-hitting, too, charged with a palpable rock ’n’ roll immediacy that’s as evident in his most intimate solo acoustic performances as it is in the full-tilt band shows that have packed rooms across his native Lone Star State from the Blue Light in Lubbock to the world’s biggest honkytonk, Billy Bob’s Texas in Fort Worth. And with the April 21st release of Ringling Road, his eagerly awaited fourth album, Green is set to make his biggest impact on the booming Texas/Red Dirt music scene — and beyond — yet.

But just don’t call him the “Next Big Thing,” because as Green makes patently clear on Ringling Road’s riotously myth-busting opening track, that’s a laugh, buddy. And even with tongue firmly in cheek, William Clark Green is only interested in being real.

“Oh it’s hard to pay your dues when there ain’t no money in the bank
It’s a shame
I gotta make it to the show but there ain’t no gas in the tank
It’s insane
what you do for a broken heart and some busted strings
And everybody saying I’m the next big thing!”

“I’m actually a little nervous about what people are going to think of that song, and if they’ll think I’m being an asshole,” Clark admits with a laugh. “And that’s not the case at all, because it’s actually sarcastic as hell. But we’ve been hearing that ‘you’re the next big thing’ thing for a long time now — and I’m guilty of saying the same to some of my songwriter friends who are struggling out there, too. And even though it’s always meant in a nice way, you can’t help but think, ‘What? I have no idea what you’re talking about. I’m actually sleeping in my truck tonight!”

Not that he’s complaining. Green is nothing if not fully committed to his chosen path. Granted, had a few chips fallen a little differently, he could have just as easily — and happily — devoted his life to ranching, but fate dictated pretty early on that he was meant to be a troubadour. He may have started taking guitar lessons at 13 primarily out of boredom — his family had just moved from Flint, Texas to College Station in the summer, and he didn’t have any new school friends yet — but it wasn’t long before he developed a keen interest in songwriting. A healthy obsession with his father’s copy of Willis Alan Ramsay’s classic 1972 debut had a lot to do with that (“That’s still the best album I’ve ever heard, and the reason I use three names,” Green enthuses). So did timing: “I remember seeing Robert Earl Keen and Pat Green and even Jerry Jeff Walker at the Wolf Pen Creek Amphitheater in College Station when I was in high school,” he says. “The scene was really kind of in its birth then, and I was right there in the middle, paying attention and really intrigued by all of it.”

College originally wasn’t part of his game plan — “I was a very poor student, and I still wanted to be a cowboy” — but after a lead on a ranch-hand job fell through and a miserable two-week stint at a feed lot scared him straight, Green enrolled in junior college and eventually found his way to Texas Tech. He majored in agriculture economics, but spent more time songwriting and playing guitar at every open-mic night and hotel bar gig he could find than actually studying. By the time fellow Red Raider and Texas country rising star Josh Abbott handed him the keys to his Tuesday-night residency at the Blue Light, Green and his own band were on their way.

“That’s when things got really serious for me,” Green recalls. “I came out with my first record [2008’s Dangerous Man], and it kind of got to the point where I knew if I was going to pursue music, I’d have to give it everything I had, because there’s just no room for half-assing it in this business. School went to the wayside — I ended up graduating, but it took six years because music was my priority. And here I am now at 28 — about to release our fourth album and hoping to get to five before I’m 30. That’ll be a pretty quick turn around, but that’s the goal.”

The aforementioned “next big thing” rumors started up in the wake of his second album, 2010’s Misunderstood, but it was 2013’s Rose Queen that proved his real breakthrough. Green recorded the album, produced by Rachel Loy in Nashville, at a real crossroads in his career — with momentum and high expectations at his back but barely enough money in the bank to foot the bill (and that only after a desperate call for help to angel investor Wade Bowen saved the day). “It was a huge leap of faith,” Green says today, “but I told the band, ‘We’re going to pull out all the stops, and we’re going to find a way to make exactly the record we want to make and need to make.” The end result was a triumph, yielding Green’s first three top-10 Texas Radio
hits, including two chart-toppers in “She Likes the Beatles” and “Hanging Around” (the former also won “Song of the Year” honors at the fan-voted Lone Star Music Awards).

Of course, all of that set the bar even higher for the follow-up — and Ringling Road delivers in spades. Returning to Nashville to team once again with Loy (Green calls working with the gifted up-and-coming producer “the best decision I’ve ever made in my musical career”), the band overcame a a couple of early setbacks — longtime drummer Jay Saldana had recently left for a new gig with Wade Bowen, followed by guitarist Steve Marcus breaking his arm a week before they went into the studio — to come through like champs under pressure. Saldana ended up coming back as a guest to drum on most of the record (along with new band member Ryan Garza), while the lead guitars duties were initially shared between Nashville session vet Kenny Greenberg and band friend Josh Serrato, recruited out of fellow Texas band Six Market Boulevard for what originally supposed to be “fill-in” duty. By the time Marcus’ arm healed up enough for him to join the sessions halfway through, though, Serrato had been promoted from temp to full-time band member. Greenberg ended up staying on for the rest of the record as well.

“All three of those guys are monster talents on guitar, so It was a really incredible experience to have them all working with each other in the studio,” Green marvels. “It all just happened the way it was supposed to, and we weren’t going to get in the way of that!”

With that formidable triple-guitar threat augmented by Green on acoustic, seasoned band member Cameron Moreland on bass and key assists from Loy and others on background vocals and a few other instrumental tracks, it’s no wonder that Ringling Road boasts the fullest sound of any WCG album to date. But as has been the case since day one of Green’s career, it’s the quality of his songs that ultimately makes the boldest statement. And it’s not just the flatout rockers (“Next Big Thing”) and irresistibly catchy, up-tempo numbers (“Sticks and Stones,” “Creek Don’t Rise,” “Going Home”) that hit hard, either. Other highlights include “Old Fashioned,” a stirring elegy for a bygone Texas (“The interstate’s pumping just like a vein full of California license plates”), and the uproarious, Todd Snider-worthy title track, which takes its name from a real road in Green’s current hometown of Eastland, Texas. Back in the day, the Ringling Bros. Circus used Eastland as a regular resting stop between shows, where the elephants and other animals were let off the train for a drink and the myriad circus folk would unwind and do whatever circus folk usually do on their nights off. As colorfully imagined by Green and co-writers Ross Cooper and Randal Clay, that was a helluva lot more wild and entertaining than the actual ticketed performances.

“Ross is a good friend of mine from Lubbock, and Randal is a guy he met in Nashville who was actually a roustabout for 10 years,” Green explains. “I mean, what better way to write a song about the circus than to write it with a guy like that? Randal brought in a lot of truths about what really does happen behind the scenes in the circus. To be honest, after I told them about Eastland and the history of Ringling Road, he and Ross just got going on this tangent that was so good, I kind of just sat back and was like, ‘keep going!’”

“Ringling Road,” the song, may be a freak-show blast, but the rest of the album is hardly all fun and circus games. “Final This Time” is a devastatingly frank post-mortem of a divorce Green witnessed between two close friends. “Fool Me Once” and “Hey Sarah,” two of the three songs (along with “Sticks and Stones”) that Green wrote solo, are unflinching accounts of his own firsthand experiences at bad (or at least uncertain) love. And the lead single “Sympathy” (already a No. 1 on Texas radio) offers anything but sympathy to a former lover looking for a shoulder to cry on.

Most brutal of all, though, is the hauntingly plaintive “Still Think About You,” in which the kind of sympathy Green does offer an ex comes laced with painfully bitter honesty: “Sorry that you fell in love with someone you could never inspire …”

“You know, it’s not that I’m an asshole,” Green says again, laughing. “But I feel like everybody has those selfish feelings sometimes, but they’re never said in songs. I actually showed that
song — I had the chorus written but still needed the verses — to Randy Rogers and Sean McConnell, and they both went, ‘oh, that’s not my style.’ And I thought, ‘Well, maybe this is a terrible idea …’”

Before giving up on it, though, Green showed it to one other trusted friend: Kent Finlay, songwriter’s songwriter, founder of the legendary Cheatham Street Warehouse in San Marcos, Texas, and, not for nothing, Green’s co-writer on Rose Queen’s hit single “Hanging Around.” Sage soul that he was, Finlay — who sadly passed away on March 2, 2015 after a long illness — took a shine to the unfinished song at first pitch.

“I took it to Kent and said, ‘I’ve got this song, and no one seems to like it,’” Green recalls. “But I played what I had for him, and he went, ‘Oh, I like that!’ And I was like, ‘Thank God, finally somebody does!’ So we ended up finishing it together, and I’m really glad we did.

“Taking uncomfortable feelings like that and putting them to paper and writing songs about them — that’s kind of been my staple, really,” Green continues. “And that song is about as true as it
gets.”

He pauses on that thought for a moment. “Now, I don’t know if that’s a good thing or a bad thing,” he adds with a laugh, “but I guess the truth prevails! And that makes me able to sleep at
night.”

 
     


ep-2016

—    Saturday, February 25th, 2017    —

 

Doors 8pm    |    19+ Show    |    $22 in Adv. / $25 Day of Show

 

Eric Paslay, delivers a powerful punch as a renowned, Platinum-selling, hit songwriter and dynamic performer. Paslay has celebrated five No. 1 hits including “Even If It Breaks Your Heart” (Eli Young Band), “Barefoot Blue Jean Night” (Jake Owen), “Angel Eyes” (Love & Theft), “Rewind” (Rascal Flatts) and “FridayNight,” the smash lead single from his critically…

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